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How much energy is used by your home computer?

How much energy is used by your home computer?

When you think of objects in your home that use a lot of electricity, you probably think of your air conditioner and heater. And you’d be right.

You probably don’t think about your computer though, but you should.

In this article, we’ll explain how much electricity your computer uses. We’ll also share some energy-saving tips as well.

How Much Electricity Does a Computer Use

If you’ve ever wondered, “How much electricity does a computer use,” we’re sorry to say that there is no clear answer. That being said, we’ll try our best here to help answer the question.

Most computers are built to use up to 400 kilowatts of electricity per hour, but they usually use less than that.

The average CPU uses about as many kilowatts per hour as the typical light bulb. Any computer that’s running on a Pentium-type processor uses about 100 kWh. This is with the monitor off. Your computer’s monitor probably uses more electricity than the actual processor itself.

Once you turn on your monitor the electricity use rate goes up. Different computers are going to use different amounts of energy. Speakers, printers, monitors, and other types of hardware are all going to use some electricity to run. It’ll also take power to connect these things to your computer. This is all going to affect your electricity usage.

The same thing happens when you open up a program and start doing work on your computer or laptop. The amount of electricity your computer uses will vary depending on the program you’re using. For example, a word document program will use less electricity than a computer game. Downloading, uploading, and streaming files are all going to take a larger amount of energy than reading a pdf file or doing something else text related.

As you can see, there’s a countless number of reasons why your electricity use will vary. These variables make it impossible to explain how much electricity your computer uses.

That being said, you can make some guesses about your usage and cost.

Look at your equipment’s maximum electric capacity. You can find that information in the user manuals, on the box your hardware came in, or with a quick Google search. Once you have those numbers added together, find how much the average kilowatt-hour costs in your state. These numbers will vary from city to city, but at least the state average will give you a rough usage estimate. Once you have the average cost for your state, multiply the kilowatt usage by that cost. This will tell you how much it costs you to power your computer for an hour. This final figure assumes that your computer is being put through its paces.

Chances are that you do not demand that much from your computer. It likely uses electricity and therefore costs much less to use than your estimate. But, at least you know the maximum it costs.

You can even take it a step further and multiply it by the estimated number of hours you use it every day to get an idea of how much electricity you use daily.

Doing a little bit of legwork will help you figure out your electricity usage better than we can.

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anonymous ethnic mother working on netbook near baby and husband sleeping in bedroom

Lowering your energy usage while you’re working from home

Lowering your energy usage while you’re working from home

Are you spending more time at home during the day than usual? If you answered “yes,” then you might see an increase on your monthly power bill. Not to worry, here are a few suggestions that may help keep your energy bills lower while you and your family are staying indoors all day.

One: Check peak utility hours

Energy costs can be more expensive during peak use hours. Most utility companies have information about when peak hours of use are, so double check with your utility company and adjust when you do certain things around the house, like laundry or running your dishwasher.

Two: Let the sun in

Be strategic about letting the sun into your home, especially during seasons like spring. Open your blinds and curtains during daylight hours to add more warmth. The more sun you let in, the more heat you have, too. It also adds more light into your home, so you can switch your lights off.

Three: If you have solar panels

If you have solar panels, do things that use larger appliances, like laundry and dishes during the day, because that’s when the sun is at its max, making it more efficient and cost effective for your household.

Four: Stop overcharging

Most of us prefer to have phones and other devices charged to a full 100% all of the time, but keeping our device batteries fully charged isn’t necessary. Let your battery run low before you recharge. It might be a small amount, but it adds up over time. Also, consider turning off power strips when you’re not using them to power electronics you aren’t using all the time.

Five: Go cold

Guess how much of your washer’s total energy is used to heat up the water? 90%! Unless it’s totally necessary, try using the cold cycle instead. It will help conserve energy and potentially cut down on costs.

Six: Ditch the heat dry on the dishwasher

Are you doing loads and loads more dishes? Well, if the kids are home with you, you probably are. One way to cut back on energy is to turn off your dishwasher’s heat dry option, so it uses less energy.

Stay sane and safe

This is a challenging time for all of us. Hopefully, these tips can help you stay comfortable in your homes, while using your energy responsibly. Stay sane and stay safe.

Thinking about going solar?

WE ARE:

  • Knowledgeable. We strive to understand our markets and our clients’ needs.
  • Connected. Relationships are everything to us; we connect people to their homes and to their communities.
  • Passionate. We believe that working with “all heart” can change the world.
  • Playful. We love what we do and it shows.
  • Upstanding. Our clients’ needs and best interests are at the heart of everything we do.
  • Effective. We set a high bar and move mountains to exceed expectations.

Let us know how we can help.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
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